Insect Metamophosis & Evolution: Part 3, Wings

Continued from Part 1 and Part 2:

English: Silverfish in Altona, Hamburg. Deutsc...

Silverfish

Another question about how these insects could have evolved is, how did the first insect develop wings in the first place? Evolutionists’ best guess on the ancestor of all winged insects is something like a silverfish. They don’t have anything close to wings!

Here’s one popular idea: An ancient insect used gills to breathe underwater. Slowly, those gills grew larger and larger until they were useful to fly with.

Can’t you picture the poor half-gilled worm? It can hardly breathe and it sure isn’t ready to fly out of the water yet. Plus, silverfish live on land and don’t even have gills.

Archaeognatha (bristletail)

Archaeognatha (bristletail)

Some Evolutionary scientists couldn’t swallow this story either and looked for something new. This time they started with another bug called a bristletail (it looks kind of like a silverfish with 3 wiggly wires on its back end).

Bristletails like to climb high in rainforest trees. Scientists have watched them drop out of the trees avoiding danger zones using those wires.

They thought, If you gave them enough time, some of these bugs could move those skinny wires up to the front of the body. They could widen out and grow into two sets of proper wings. Then they could learn to pump them up and down to fly.

It’s not as wild as a half-gilled bug, but you still have a bunch of problems:

  • The hairs are on the completely wrong part of the body. How do you get them to start growing in just the right place for maximum flying power?
  • Any half-winged critter is going to have a lot of trouble climbing around with the extra baggage. It would be an easy target for bug eaters. Natural selection says only things useful to an organism will survive. Anything useless will be thrown out.
  • You have to build a whole system of muscles, membranes, supports, and nerves before wings are of any use. The way insects fly is far more complicated than anything people have come up with.

You need a huge dose of belief to picture all the changes the bug has to go through for these things to work.

Tiger swallowtail butterfly, Shawnee National ...

Tiger swallowtail butterfly

Every creature has many parts. Until each part is fully formed and the rest of the body is working with it, the part is just a drag. An organism with half-baked abilities is a dead organism.

God is powerful enough to make a creature ready to live and thrive from the very beginning. He didn’t have to invent fancy stories about how butterflies or anything else changed to fit its home so perfectly and beautifully, too.

“My hands have made both heaven and earth;
    they and everything in them are mine.
    I, the Lord, have spoken!

“I will bless those who have humble and contrite hearts,
    who tremble at my word. Isaiah 66:2 NLT

One thought on “Insect Metamophosis & Evolution: Part 3, Wings

  1. Pingback: Insect Metamorphosis & Evolution: Part 1 | Creation Science 4 Kids

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