Serpent Legs, Creationists Down Under & Experiments in a Baggie

[Podcast Episode 75] What’s with God telling the Serpent it would crawl on the ground? Let’s find out what the creation community has uncovered about snakes, legs, and dust. Then it’s a bit of creation worldview thinking with real time experiments on a big scale at a ministry in Australia, followed up with the least messy way to do homespun experiments- in a baggie!

Saw Scaled Viper, photo credit: Dinesh Valke

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Genesis 3:14

And the LORD God said unto the serpent, Because thou hast done this, thou art cursed above all cattle, and above every beast of the field; upon thy belly shalt thou go, and dust shalt thou eat all the days of thy life:

Articles I used to answer my questions:

Creation Research in Australia

I’ve been following this exciting and bold ministry Down Under for years- actually since Eric Hovind had John MacKay on his show back in 2011. He’s a hands on type of guy digging up his own fossils and it’s amazing to see how confidently their ministry is standing against the world’s philosophies, both with ideas and real world experiments.

No evolutionary, deep time believer can demonstrate the reality of how the world follows their thinking the way we can as creationists!

Our experiments take moments, minutes, or hours, theirs require millions of years!

The newsletter I mention in the show is available to read online and you can subscribe to get them for your own family as well.

Experiments in a Baggie

I’d love to know any other experiments you have done using common ingredients and these easy to clean containers. We did these three:

  • Dissolve the shell off an egg with vinegar
  • Feed yeast and see what they produce
  • See how much gas you get from mixing baking soda and vinegar

All of these don’t require a high degree of precision. This video of a guy getting his baggie to explode is a second way to keep the baking soda dry until you’ve sealed it in, but any method you use to keep it away from the vinegar is fine. Mom Warning: he is a little crude at the end, but not too badly.

This egg experiment didn’t leave it submerged long enough for the osmosis to be noticeable, but it shows you what happens well and he doesn’t take things to seriously (that cat is smart!):

This video showing yeast foaming does a great job setting things up and doing multiple variations to show how differently the results can turn out under various conditions. Watching it I think the yeast that was covered might have just been squeezed too much since it was under pressure- not sure she proved they needed a fresh supply of oxygen. But it’s a delightful watch and you’ll at least learn why you don’t ever add boiling water to your yeast dough!

 

 

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